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Mighty US faces humbling defeat at the hands of Mother Nature.




Is this an unofficial Apertheid Policy?I asked myself, ‘why are most images of distraught victims of Katrina shown on news media mostly of blacks?’ It looked as if the weather had hit some remote African nation...but it was mainland USA. And the many blacks shown on TV where US citizens.

Am I the only person who noticed this?

It made me wonder: Is slavery over in the States or is there an unofficial Apertheid policy that causes such a failure by the State in its reaction to the whole disaster...

What if Katrina had hit a predominantly white and affluent area of the USA? Would there be this chaos? Would there be this dismay? Would there have been this loss of life ( 1,000and counting)? Would the US armed forces have taken so long to react?




Refugees are telling tales of horror...

Mothers scrape out their babies' nappies so they may be used again.

Read on.

But stop here if you are sensitive.


Our brothers and sisters in the US are facing a disaster. It could happen to us, and we will probably be worse off...

But I just cannot understand how, notwithstanding its immense arsenal of resources, manpower and advanced technology, the US could not defend its citizens better than it did so far! Its a sure let down. The US could certainly do much better.

Its a humbling experience...and a scary one knowing that us in Europe, and particularly in Malta, such a natural disaster could spell worse scenarios...or, would it?

.........................................................

At the New Orleans' Superdome stadium, refugees describe piles of faeces, knee-high, after the toilets overflowed and people were forced to relieve themselves on staircases.


At least seven bodies are scattered outside the city's convention centre.

People sheltering at New Orleans' main refuges say they have been robbed of their humanity.

"I don't treat my dog like that," 47-year-old Daniel Edwards said as he pointed at a woman who lay dead in her wheelchair outside the convention centre.

"We pee on the floor. We are like animals," 25-year-old Taffany Smith told the Los Angeles Times, cradling her three-week-old son in the Superdome stadium.

Up to 20,000 refugees from the devastation wreaked by Hurricane Katrina have been corralled into each building.

This is where they were told to come, but the authorities were woefully unprepared for the arrival of such numbers, who include the very young, the very old, and the very infirm.




Pervading stench

For days they have been without adequate electricity, sanitation, or food supplies waiting to be taken from what many describe as a scene from hell.

"We got dead bodies sitting next to us for days. I feel like I am going to die "

(Personal comment) Thomas Jessie



All who have been inside the Superdome speak of the pervading stench of human waste.

Amid the deteriorating conditions at both refuges, horrific stories are emerging.

At the Superdome there were two reports of rape, one involving a child, while police at the convention centre said there had been similar reported incidents.

Others described what it was like to live among the dead.

"We got dead bodies sitting next to us for days. I feel like I am going to die. People are going to kill you for water," Thomas Jessie, a 31-year-old roofer, told the AFP news agency after spending the night in the convention centre.

Keep on coming

And the slow evacuation has only contributed to tensions. The head of the city's emergency operations, Terry Ebbert, warned it had become an "incredibly explosive situation".


Heat and exhaustion proved too much for some in the queue
"This is a national emergency. This is a national disgrace," he said.

At the Superdome, fighting and gunshots broke out in the long desperate line of people waiting for the chance to board one of the school buses deployed to take them away.

Medical evacuations from the Superdome on Thursday were temporarily disrupted after a gun shot was fired at a rescue helicopter.

Meanwhile people continued to arrive, many wading through water to get there. Their homes destroyed, they have nowhere else to go.

By Thursday evening, 11 hours after the evacuation began, the stadium had 10,000 more people than it did at dawn.

Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/4207944.stm

Comments

Travis said…
The United States is a very complex culture that I'm not sure I can even explain. Here is my attempt to respond to your post.

To understand why the people you are seeing on news coverage of the devastated city are primarily black, it’s useful to examine the culture of that particular area of the United States. After the US Civil War in the 1800’s, slaves, who were located in the Southeast region of the country, were released and for the most part traveled to cities, as there was little land to purchase (and slaves had little money) or work available in rural areas (except for the work they had just been freed from). The white population of the region, who had lost the war over their right to own slaves, didn’t want the black workers around. Without going into too much detail, the government wasn’t able to quell much of the injustices suffered by the black population, until segregation and anti-discrimination laws are passed in the mid 1900’s. In the meantime, many blacks were forced to live in inner-city slums and continued to have limited access to good paying jobs because of deficiencies in needed skills and education. These problems continue today. The US Government, as well as state and local agencies, try to provide more opportunities to the poor, and have experienced some success. However, there is still much to be done to improve the situation.

Many here in the United States are also appalled at the response of our government in New Orleans. This is not representative of American culture or the way American’s treat those who are in dire need of help.

Below is an article that I came across that may give you insight into why things are the way they are in New Orleans. I don't agree with the negative theme of the article, but much of what it says about those individuals committing the crimes in the flooded city is probably accurate.
----------

An Unnatural Disaster: A Hurricane Exposes the Man-Made Disaster of the Welfare State

by Robert Tracinski
Sep 02, 2005
by Robert Tracinski
It has taken four long days for state and federal officials to figure out how to deal with the disaster in New Orleans. I can't blame them, because it has also taken me four long days to figure out what is going on there. The reason is that the events there make no sense if you think that we are confronting a natural disaster.

If this is just a natural disaster, the response for public officials is obvious: you bring in food, water, and doctors; you send transportation to evacuate refugees to temporary shelters; you send engineers to stop the flooding and rebuild the city's infrastructure. For journalists, natural disasters also have a familiar pattern: the heroism of ordinary people pulling together to survive; the hard work and dedication of doctors, nurses, and rescue workers; the steps being taken to clean up and rebuild.

Public officials did not expect that the first thing they would have to do is to send thousands of armed troops in armored vehicle, as if they are suppressing an enemy insurgency. And journalists--myself included--did not expect that the story would not be about rain, wind, and flooding, but about rape, murder, and looting.

But this is not a natural disaster. It is a man-made disaster.

The man-made disaster is not an inadequate or incompetent response by federal relief agencies, and it was not directly caused by Hurricane Katrina. This is where just about every newspaper and television channel has gotten the story wrong.

The man-made disaster we are now witnessing in New Orleans did not happen over the past four days. It happened over the past four decades. Hurricane Katrina merely exposed it to public view.

The man-made disaster is the welfare state.

For the past few days, I have found the news from New Orleans to be confusing. People were not behaving as you would expect them to behave in an emergency--indeed, they were not behaving as they have behaved in other emergencies. That is what has shocked so many people: they have been saying that this is not what we expect from America. In fact, it is not even what we expect from a Third World country.

When confronted with a disaster, people usually rise to the occasion. They work together to rescue people in danger, and they spontaneously organize to keep order and solve problems. This is especially true in America. We are an enterprising people, used to relying on our own initiative rather than waiting around for the government to take care of us. I have seen this a hundred times, in small examples (a small town whose main traffic light had gone out, causing ordinary citizens to get out of their cars and serve as impromptu traffic cops, directing cars through the intersection) and large ones (the spontaneous response of New Yorkers to September 11).

So what explains the chaos in New Orleans?

To give you an idea of the magnitude of what is going on, here is a description from a Washington Times story:

"Storm victims are raped and beaten; fights erupt with flying fists, knives and guns; fires are breaking out; corpses litter the streets; and police and rescue helicopters are repeatedly fired on.

"The plea from Mayor C. Ray Nagin came even as National Guardsmen poured in to restore order and stop the looting, carjackings and gunfire....

"Last night, Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco said 300 Iraq-hardened Arkansas National Guard members were inside New Orleans with shoot-to-kill orders.

" 'These troops are...under my orders to restore order in the streets,' she said. 'They have M-16s, and they are locked and loaded. These troops know how to shoot and kill and they are more than willing to do so if necessary and I expect they will.' "

The reference to Iraq is eerie. The photo that accompanies this article shows National Guard troops, with rifles and armored vests, riding on an armored vehicle through trash-strewn streets lined by a rabble of squalid, listless people, one of whom appears to be yelling at them. It looks exactly like a scene from Sadr City in Baghdad.

What explains bands of thugs using a natural disaster as an excuse for an orgy of looting, armed robbery, and rape? What causes unruly mobs to storm the very buses that have arrived to evacuate them, causing the drivers to drive away, frightened for their lives? What causes people to attack the doctors trying to treat patients at the Super Dome?

Why are people responding to natural destruction by causing further destruction? Why are they attacking the people who are trying to help them?

My wife, Sherri, figured it out first, and she figured it out on a sense-of-life level. While watching the coverage last night on Fox News Channel, she told me that she was getting a familiar feeling. She studied architecture at the Illinois Institute of Chicago, which is located in the South Side of Chicago just blocks away from the Robert Taylor Homes, one of the largest high-rise public housing projects in America. "The projects," as they were known, were infamous for uncontrollable crime and irremediable squalor. (They have since, mercifully, been demolished.)

What Sherri was getting from last night's television coverage was a whiff of the sense of life of "the projects." Then the "crawl"--the informational phrases flashed at the bottom of the screen on most news channels--gave some vital statistics to confirm this sense: 75% of the residents of New Orleans had already evacuated before the hurricane, and of the 300,000 or so who remained, a large number were from the city's public housing projects. Jack Wakeland then gave me an additional, crucial fact: early reports from CNN and Fox indicated that the city had no plan for evacuating all of the prisoners in the city's jails--so they just let many of them loose. There is no doubt a significant overlap between these two populations--that is, a large number of people in the jails used to live in the housing projects, and vice versa.

There were many decent, innocent people trapped in New Orleans when the deluge hit--but they were trapped alongside large numbers of people from two groups: criminals--and wards of the welfare state, people selected, over decades, for their lack of initiative and self-induced helplessness. The welfare wards were a mass of sheep--on whom the incompetent administration of New Orleans unleashed a pack of wolves.

All of this is related, incidentally, to the apparent incompetence of the city government, which failed to plan for a total evacuation of the city, despite the knowledge that this might be necessary. But in a city corrupted by the welfare state, the job of city officials is to ensure the flow of handouts to welfare recipients and patronage to political supporters--not to ensure a lawful, orderly evacuation in case of emergency.

No one has really reported this story, as far as I can tell. In fact, some are already actively distorting it, blaming President Bush, for example, for failing to personally ensure that the Mayor of New Orleans had drafted an adequate evacuation plan. The worst example is an execrable piece from the Toronto Globe and Mail, by a supercilious Canadian who blames the chaos on American "individualism." But the truth is precisely the opposite: the chaos was caused by a system that was the exact opposite of individualism.

What Hurricane Katrina exposed was the psychological consequences of the welfare state. What we consider "normal" behavior in an emergency is behavior that is normal for people who have values and take the responsibility to pursue and protect them. People with values respond to a disaster by fighting against it and doing whatever it takes to overcome the difficulties they face. They don't sit around and complain that the government hasn't taken care of them. They don't use the chaos of a disaster as an opportunity to prey on their fellow men.

But what about criminals and welfare parasites? Do they worry about saving their houses and property? They don't, because they don't own anything. Do they worry about what is going to happen to their businesses or how they are going to make a living? They never worried about those things before. Do they worry about crime and looting? But living off of stolen wealth is a way of life for them.

The welfare state--and the brutish, uncivilized mentality it sustains and encourages--is the man-made disaster that explains the moral ugliness that has swamped New Orleans. And that is the story that no one is reporting.

Source: TIA Daily -- September 2, 2005

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Creatures

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He/she who wants to understand, let him/her understand... ..................................................................
Written upon reading: http://w…